Category Archives: Macintosh Advice

Cannot sign into GMail on older iPads and iPhones?

Allow Mac os X Mail to Add Gmail

Can’t access Gmail on an older iOS device?

Are you having trouble logging into Gmail on an older iOS device like an iPad or iPhone? I had this issue a few minutes ago where I was trying to put in my Gmail password, which I verified was correct, and it kept telling me my username or password were incorrect. After further digging, I found out that Google considers the older iOS mail software used on an iPad or iPhone as “unsecure,” and blocks it.

Here’s the fix to allow Gmail on your older iPad or iPhone.

First, visit http://www.google.com/accounts/DisplayUnlockCaptcha and sign in with your Gmail username and password. If necessary, enter the letters in the distorted picture.

Secondly, and even more important, visit this website: Allow less secure apps and choose “Allow” to let less secure apps access your Google account. This is a less secure option, but, it may be the only way to get your older iPad or iPhone mail software to allow access to Gmail.

Incoming search terms:

  • poran comHD

Has Apple Music deleted any of your personal music collection?

A severe iTunes bug can delete personal music in Apple Music

Have you lost music off of your computer while using Apple music? Apple is supposedly working on a fix for this.

Recently, many reports have surfaced from around the web that claim that Apple music is deleting users personal email collections randomly.

While Apple has personally said that this is not a reproducible issue, there are clearly many instances with Apple music and iTunes Match in general (such as this one, this one and this one) of this happening. Finally, the silence has been broken by Apple and they claim to be working on a fix for iTunes that will stop this from happening. The fix for iTunes will include extra safeguards that should ensure that no music gets deleted off of the user’s computer without explicit permission.

Who’s affected by this bug an Apple Music?

Apple has basically said that a small number of users have complained about this issue and they’re taking it very seriously to get to the bottom of it. There’s a lot of complex matching happening behind the scenes between the users computer and Apple servers that host the music. Complaints range from music simply disappearing off of the computer, to the wrong songs being matched when uploaded to Apple’s music server. In some cases, music that was personally created by musicians were deleted without warning from the user’s computer. Apple has previously released patches that addressed some of these issues, but the main issue of disappearing music is back in the news.

There is no word when the actual patch will become available but keep checking back here and we will report when it becomes ready for download. In the meantime let us know in our poll below if you’ve lost music on Apple music.

Have you lost music while using Apple Music or iTunes Match?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

 

 

 

 

Mac OS X System Preferences Keeps Crashing on Launch

Mac OS X System Preferences Crash

Mac OS X System Preferences Crashing? Here’s a good trick to try.

Do you find that the System Preferences application on Mac OS X keeps crashing when you either open it, or, try to access any of the individual system preference panes in the window? Here’s something to try if you find yourself with this issue.

First, you are going to be using the Mac OS X Terminal application, which is located in the Utilities folder inside of your Applications folder. You would want to back up any important data before doing these steps, hopefully with Time Machine and an external disk. We are not responsible for any data loss.

Here’s What to Do To Fix Your System Preferences–Proceed Carefully.

You are going to want to select the line of code below, and copy it to the clipboard (edit menu –> copy), so we can paste it into the Terminal window. This will move a possibly corrupt system preferences plist file to your desktop.

mv L*/P*/.GlobalPreferences.plist Desktop/GlobalPreferences.plist

At this time, you will want to paste this code into the Terminal window by choosing “paste” from the edit menu. You can now hit the “return” key on your Mac OS X keyboard, which now should move this file to your desktop. Leave it on the desktop for now. At this time, you will either want to logout of your Mac, by choosing “logout” in the Apple menu (and then logging back in from the login window) , or, simply choosing “restart” from the Apple menu. When the Mac comes back to your desktop, you can then try to launch system preferences once again. If all goes well, you will now have full control over the system preferences in question.

If this does not work, and you want to return this file to its original place, you can copy and paste the line of code below into the Terminal once again. If this trick worked, please leave a comment so other readers can decide to try it or not.

mv Desktop/GlobalPreferences.plist L*/P*/.GlobalPreferences.plist

Please consider a small and secure donation if this post helped you with your issue!




Incoming search terms:

  • mac system preferences wont load

How do you burn a disk image (DMG) in El Capitan?

Capital Mac Service Tune Up

What happened to the disk burning options in Disk Utility? They are now part of the Mac OS X Finder!

How do I burn a Disk Image in Mac OS X El Capitan?

If you noticed recently, Mac OS X El Capitan has removed a lot of handy features from the Disk Utility program–one of them being the ability to burn disk images (DMG or IMG). This used to be a staple feature in Disk Utility. As with most things, Apple has since decided that this is no longer a viable option and simply removed it from Disk Utility, as well as the “clone” feature that also used to be there. In order to burn disk images on Mac OS X El Capitan, here’s what you now have to do instead:

  1. Head to the Mac OS X Finder
  2. Select the disk image (DMG or IMG) that you need to burn in the Finder
  3. Go to the File menu and choose “Burn Disk Image ____ to Disk”
  4. Insert your blank DVD or CD and click on the Burn button in this window

That’s pretty much it–even though it’s no longer listed in Disk Utility, you can still burn CD or DVD’s of your favorite disk images right in the Mac OS X El Capitan Finder.

How to make a bootable USB Mac OS X Yosemite install drive

Capital Mac Service Business Services

Let Capital Mac Service be your Macintosh business connection in the Capital District area!

Since there haven’t been CD’s or DVD’s to reinstall Mac OS X software in the last few years, here’s a fast and easy way to get yourself any of the Macintosh OS X versions on your own USB flash drive. This is a great trick for any Macintosh IT folks who need to do installs all day long!

What you’ll need for your Mac OS X Yosemite USB installer

  1. At least an 8GB USB flash memory stick, such as this model
  2. The Mac OS X Yosemite downloaded installer (more on this soon)
  3. Some Mac OS X Terminal voodoo (more on this, too)

The first step in creating your own bootable USB Mac OS X Yosemite install drive

First, we are going to insert our USB flash drive–make sure it’s empty since it will be erased later. It has to be formatted in disk utility if it’s not already formatted, so go ahead and do this in the disk utility program. Make sure the name of the flash drive is “untitled” for the sake of this example. Also make sure you have the Mac OS X Yosemite installer, which is located in the Applications folder. If you don’t see it there, you will have to go to the Mac App Store and redownload it from your purchases tab. This may take awhile, since the file is around 6GB.

We are going to launch the Terminal, which is located in the Utilities folder inside of your Applications folder. If you don’t know where any of that is, this article may be a bit advanced for you. Launch the Terminal and copy and paste the next code into the Terminal window and hit return–(you will be asked for your administration password!):

sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia –volume /Volumes/Untitled –applicationpath /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app –nointeraction

The Terminal will now show you progress of the process, which can take 30 to 90 minutes or even more. You will see things like: Erasing Disk: 0%…10 percent…20 percent… during the process. Eventually, it will copy the installer files and make the disk bootable. After the “done” command appears, you will have a perfectly good Yosemite Mac OS X installer USB drive.