Tag Archives: iTunes

Has Apple Music deleted any of your personal music collection?

A severe iTunes bug can delete personal music in Apple Music

Have you lost music off of your computer while using Apple music? Apple is supposedly working on a fix for this.

Recently, many reports have surfaced from around the web that claim that Apple music is deleting users personal email collections randomly.

While Apple has personally said that this is not a reproducible issue, there are clearly many instances with Apple music and iTunes Match in general (such as this one, this one and this one) of this happening. Finally, the silence has been broken by Apple and they claim to be working on a fix for iTunes that will stop this from happening. The fix for iTunes will include extra safeguards that should ensure that no music gets deleted off of the user’s computer without explicit permission.

Who’s affected by this bug an Apple Music?

Apple has basically said that a small number of users have complained about this issue and they’re taking it very seriously to get to the bottom of it. There’s a lot of complex matching happening behind the scenes between the users computer and Apple servers that host the music. Complaints range from music simply disappearing off of the computer, to the wrong songs being matched when uploaded to Apple’s music server. In some cases, music that was personally created by musicians were deleted without warning from the user’s computer. Apple has previously released patches that addressed some of these issues, but the main issue of disappearing music is back in the news.

There is no word when the actual patch will become available but keep checking back here and we will report when it becomes ready for download. In the meantime let us know in our poll below if you’ve lost music on Apple music.

Have you lost music while using Apple Music or iTunes Match?

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What does an “Error 53” mean on an iPhone?

iPhone 6 Error 53Does your iPhone show the dreaded “Error 53” since updating to iOS 9? We attempt to get to the bottom of this iPhone controversy.

What does the Error 53 actually mean?

Simply put, this error is a currently unfixable error that is displayed by Apple’s iTunes software after restoring an iPhone, usually an iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. In essence, the iPhone becomes “bricked,” or rendered completely unusable and traps the device into recovery mode. The data that was on the iPhone is also now locked on the device and cannot be rescued by the user or Apple. There is limited evidence that any of the other iPhone versions are susceptible to this error, such as the iPhone 5 versions. Even iPads with Apple’s Touch ID sensors can also throw this error 53 after restoring or updating.

What is the root cause of this mysterious Error 53?

According to statements released by Apple, the cause of the iOS Error 53 stems from the replacement of a user’s home button, Touch ID, display or any of the other components that make up the fingerprint sensor area by any outfit other than Apple themselves. In other words, if you were to have your home button (or even full display) replaced by a kiosk or other non-Apple repair shop, you will most certainly see the dreaded Error 53.

Apple Touch ID Sensor

Simply repairing your iPhone at a non-Apple store can render your device bricked forever.

The reason for this (according to Apple) is that iOS checks that your Touch ID sensor matches the other on-board components during a software update or iOS restore. This simple set of checks supposedly keeps the features related to Touch ID secure, just in case a malicious party tries to swap out this critical part in an attempt to steal your personal data and credentials. This fingerprint data is stored in an area on your IPhone known as the “Secure Enclave,” which was designed by Apple to store this data securely and safely. If a 3rd-party Touch ID module fails this onboard check, the secure data is forever encrypted and protected and no longer accessible.

When Apple themselves replace this critical part, they perform a procedure to recalibrate the iPhone parts back together again, which allows the onboard checks to pass. Users who have the iPhone fixed at an Apple Store will not see this dreaded Error 53 after restoring or updating.

 

Most of the iPhone community including many repair websites are claiming that this is a very bad move on Apple’s part. In essence, Apple seemingly is making sure that iPhones cannot be serviced anywhere but a genuine Apple Store.

What is the fallout of the Error 53 situation?

Error 53 Class Action Lawsuit

Law firms are already mounting class-action lawsuits over the error 53 situation

At this point, several news agencies are reporting that class-action lawsuits are being mounted against Apple for this move and the Apple discussion boards are being flooded by users with the Error 53 on their iPhones and iPads.

How do you fix an Error 53 on an iPhone?

At this time, there is no known solution to this error and Apple has not given any more direction since their last statement describing why the error 53 is happening on modified iPhones and iPads.

I haven’t gotten the Error 53 yet. Why?

If you have had any modifications or repairs to your IPhone or iPad that were not done by Apple themselves, we highly suggest that you do not do any further software updates to the device until a solution is found for the error 53 problem. If you need any further repairs done on the device, you would be best served by the Apple Store or AppleCare helpline. Apple has the proper equipment to fix your device and recalibrate it correctly so you don’t see the error 53. If you no longer have access to the old parts from your repair (not that they would work anyway), you would be forced to purchase a brand-new iPhone.

Contact Apple for resolution.

If you have the dreaded iPhone Error 53 issue, please contact Apple as soon as possible by clicking here.

Did your iTunes Keyboard Media Keys Stop Working?

iTunes Media Keys Not Working

iTunes Media Keys Not Working? Try this trick.

I had an inquiry at Capital Mac Service the other day that was rather intriguing while I was sitting on the couch working on my Macbook Pro:

“Hi, I just bought a new mac and have owned many macs before. On the top row the forward and backward and play/pause buttons (itunes media keys) that used to correspond to changing songs in itunes, don’t do that.”

Why did the itunes media keys stop working?!

Our first thought was the F-keys were not set correctly in the system preferences. Strangely enough, they were set perfectly fine–the media keys should be working. I even thought maybe a data transfer may be causing it by pulling over something weird from another Mac–he said he did not data transfer. After mulling it over for a few minutes, and a few back and forth emails about the rest of the environment, I started to think of what else could use those media keys besides iTunes, and, low and behold I had a thought. On my Mac, I only use Google Music, which is handled through the Chrome browser and I use those very same media keys to forward and rewind music. So, based on this thought, I immediately asked him if he was a Safari or Chrome user. Just like clockwork, he said he uses Chrome. I wrote him back to ask if the media keys worked when Chrome wasn’t running and a few minutes later, we had our culprit. He had installed the Google Music extension in Chrome, which was hijacking the media keys for the entire system, including iTunes. I had him remove the extension and just like magic, the keys returned to normal.

Did this fix your keyboard media key issues?

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